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What's Involved?

Free Download: Read the original 1939 book which tells the amazing story of the discovery of the monks by Peter Kelder called 'The Eye of Revelation' also known as 'The Ancient Secret of The Fountain of Youth.' Eye of Revelation e-Book - image copyright www.T5T.com

..."I have practiced yoga for many years, but after having my third child I needed some exercise that would put me back in shape and that took as little time as possible to do! T5T has been exactly what I needed. It is so simple, and yet so powerful in its effect."... Susan Hayward, bestselling author of A Guide for the Advanced Soul

The monks recommended that you build up to the required 21 repetitions of each of the five movements gradually. Begin with just three repetitions per day for the first week - then increase repetitions by just two more per week, until you are doing the required 21 repetitions in around 10 weeks. Between each of the 5 Rites, T5T®’s Energy Breathing technique is completed three times. The complete program will eventually take you between 10 to 15 minutes per day. The average is just under 10 minutes.

Experienced Five Tibetan Rites practitioner and teacher, Carolinda Witt developed a unique step-by-step method of learning the Rites that she calls T5T®. Over a period of 10 years she has taught T5T to thousands of students and forty instructors. Carolinda incorporated core stability with the Rites to protect the spine, and natural full breathing to increase vitality and health. Her method makes these ancient Rites more accessible & achievable for anyone, regardless of their skill level.

The images & instructions outlined below are from the T5T book, The 10-Minute Rejuvenation Plan (Three Rivers Press, NY 2007. They describe the beginners level of T5T and are suitable for your first week of practice when you will be doing three repetitions daily.

Beginner Level. Rite No 1 – The Spin


The Five Tibetan Rites - No 1 (copyright www.T5T.com)

  • Stand up straight with your legs hip-width apart. With your palms facing downward, raise your arms up straight, like wings, beside you.
  • Pick an object with a change of color, for example, a doorway or a window ledge, to help you count your repetitions. (Every time you see this object you count a spin.)
  • Take a breath in through the nose to remind you to breathe. Continue to breathe comfortably and naturally through your nose, remembering to check on your breathing during the spin.
  • Keeping your right foot firmly on the floor, and with your arms outstretched and your head facing forward, start to turn from left to right in a clockwise direction, walking your left foot around your anchored right foot and spinning around in a complete circle.
  • Let your spin build up speed slowly and complete three spins in a steady unbroken rhythm.
  • When you stop, immediately stand with your legs hip-width apart, knees slightly bent and your hands on your hips. Wait until all the dizziness disappears before beginning the Leg Raise.

To learn the intermediate/advanced level of The Spin, please refer to my T5T book or DVD

If you experience any problems with dizziness, please see our article
"Helpful Hints & Natural Remedies for Dizziness".

Beginner Level. Rite No 2 – The Leg Raise

  The Five Tibetan Rites - No 2 (copyright www.T5T.com)

  • Lie on your back and make certain you are lying straight.
  • Lace your fingers together, and place them under the base of your skull. "Soften" your throat.
  • Lift your pelvic floor and pull your lower abdominals in toward your spine. Keep your focus on your lower abdomen and move from this central core throughout the movement.
  • Breathe in through your nose as you lift your chin toward your chest. At the same time, slide your right foot along the ground toward your buttocks, raise your thigh to 90 degrees and straighten your leg until perpendicular to your body. Flex your toes. If your legs remain bent, work toward gradually being able to straighten them over time.
  • Check that your lower abdominals and pelvic floor are engaged, and breathe out through your nose as you bend your knee to the 90-degree position, return your foot to the floor, then slide your foot along the floor until your leg is straight. (You should have completed exhaling by the time your leg is on the floor.) As you lower your foot, lower your head - returning it to the floor in a smooth and controlled manner, feeling each vertebra pressing one at a time into the floor.
  • Allow all your muscles to relax, then repeat the above steps, raising and lowering the left leg. When you have completed this cycle you have performed one repetition.
  • Repeat this exercise in a steady, unbroken rhythm for three repetitions.

To learn the remaining nine intermediate & advanced level steps of The Leg Raise, please refer to my T5T book or DVD A new step is added each week to develop the strength of the core muscles.

Beginner Level. Rite No 3 –The Kneeling Backbend

The Five Tibetan Rites - No 3 (copyright www.T5T.com)

  • Kneel with your knees close to a wall, hip-width apart and with your toes curled under. Your abdomen should be touching the wall. Check that your hips are positioned over your knees (move your knees back a bit if they are not). Don't thrust your pelvis forward. Wrap your hands under the cheeks of your buttocks.
  • Breathing normally, lengthen your spine and lower your chin toward your chest. Make sure you are not hunching your shoulders toward your ears. This is the starting position.
  • Lift your pelvic floor and pull your lower abdominals in toward your spine. Keep your focus on your lower abdomen and move from this central core throughout the movement.
  • From here on, your breathing should be synchronized with the posture. Slowly inhale as you arch back into the posture, and slowly exhale as you return to your starting position (chin to chest).
  • Gradually squeeze your buttocks firmly together and as you breathe in begin to lengthen your spine up and out of your hips. Press back against the foundation provided by your knees and legs to help you lengthen, then lift your breastbone upward. Keep your belly button pressed against the wall. If you are doing this step correctly, your stomach will "walk" up the wall a little way.
  • Stretch (do not force yourself or puff out your ribs) to a point of comfort then arch backward. As your spine arches, allow your your head to follow, but do not let it collapse backward - keep your neck long and strong.
  • Gently squeeze your shoulder blades together at the back and focus on opening your chest. Do not jerk the shoulders downward or thrust your chest up - do not force.
  • Breathe out slowly, keeping your pelvic floor engaged, and return smoothly and with control to your starting position (chin to chest).
  • Allow your muscles to relax. This completes one repetition.
  • Repeat this exercise for three repetitions.

To learn the advanced level of The Kneeling Backbend, please refer to my T5T book or DVD

 

  Rite No 4 – Tabletop

The Five Tibetan Rites - No 4 (copyright www.T5T.com)

  • Come into the correct starting position: sitting on the floor with your back straight, your breastbone lifted, your chin to your chest and the creases of your elbows rotated forward.
  • Unlock your knees.
  • Lift your pelvic floor and pull your lower abdominals in toward your spine. Keep your focus on your lower abdomen and move from this central core throughout the movement.
  • Breathe in and lift your bottom off the floor, then use your legs to drive your knees up and forward toward your toes, coming to rest above your ankles. At the same time, let your head and shoulders move backward toward the floor behind you. Do not jerk from the arms - this is more of a rolling action onto the balls of your feet, with a simultaneous smooth curling backwards of the head.
  • Concentrate on getting the soles of your feet, and all ten toes, on the floor, and raise the middle of your abdomen and chest into a straight line (tabletop) above the floor, with your arms straight. Do not let your head hang backward. Keep it long and strong, in the same position as it would be when standing, or with your chin lightly tucked against your chest. If you prefer, you can hold your head upright.
  • You will now look like a tabletop: knees bent, feet on the floor, stomach and chest in a straight line above the floor, straight arms, and your neck long and strong. Do not push your stomach so far upward that you bend in the middle of your lower back. Once in this position, tense your muscles briefly.
  • Check that your pelvic floor is lifted and your lower abdominals are pulled in, then breathe out while focusing on your lower abdominal muscles to guide your body back into your starting position. As you come back down, make certain you keep moving your bottom back toward your arms until your legs are totally straight.
  • Relax your muscles in the starting position. This completes one repetition.
  • Each time you begin the Rite, straighten up first and make sure your chin is to your chest.
  • Repeat the Tabletop in a steady, unbroken rhythm until you have completed your desired number of repetitions. Remember to add just two repetitions per week until your reach 21.

To fine-tune your movement or refer to T5T's preliminary learning steps, please see my T5T book or DVD

Rite No 5 – Pendulum

 

The Five Tibetan Rites - No 5 (copyright www.T5T.com)

  • The starting position for the Pendulum is on your hands and knees with a "middle line" along the center of your body and your back straight.
  • Place your knees directly below your hips and your hands a little wider than shoulder width. Now move your hands farther forward by about 5 centimeters (two inches). Spread your fingers out and attempt to distribute your weight across your whole hand, including the fingers. Make sure your legs and arms are level.
  • Rotate the creases of your elbows slightly forward. Spread and curl your toes under.
  • Lift your pelvic floor and pull your lower abdominals in toward your spine. Keep your focus on your lower abdomen and move from this central core throughout the movement.
  • Breathe in and continue to inhale as you move your head downward toward your chest, lifting your knees off the floor and pushing your hips up and back - bringing your body into an upside-down V shape with your tailbone pointing toward the sky.
  • Make sure your arms are fully extended, with your shoulder blades drawn back and down toward your tailbone.
  • Tilt your chin toward your chest, relax your neck and look at your feet. Your back should be flat, not rounded - you will probably need to work toward achieving this over time.
  • Relax the back of your legs and ankles and allow your heels to drop toward the floor as best you can. Straighten your legs as much as you can but don't lock your knees.
  • Lift your buttocks and tailbone up toward the ceiling. Attempt to distribute your weight evenly between your arms and legs.
  • Engage your pelvic floor and lower abdominals. Breathing out, start to move your head and upper body down and through your arms, keeping them straight at all times with the creases of your elbows slightly rotated forward.
  • Keep your pelvic floor and lower abdominals engaged and gradually squeeze your buttocks firmly together to support your lower back, as you come up into the full upward-facing dog position.
  • Make sure your arms are fully extended, with your shoulder blades drawn back and down toward your tailbone. Lift your breastbone upward without puffing out your ribs. Aim for length rather than height.
  • Make sure your pelvis and legs are not touching the floor - only your hands and curled-under toes should be in contact with the floor. Push your heels backward to prevent you coming up onto your tiptoes. This is the full stretch.
  • Repeat these movements for the desired number of repetitions in a smooth, flowing and continuous action - almost like a pendulum. You should be breathing in as you move up, and out as you move down.
  • When you have finished your repetitions, simply bend your knees and drop them to the floor so that you are back on your hands and knees.

To fine-tune your movement or refer to T5T's preliminary learning steps, please see my T5T book or DVD

You can download a Free Poster of all the Rites by clicking here:

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To find out how well you breathe try T5T®’s breathing consultant, Michael Grant White’s
Free Breathing Tests that over 50,000 people have completed online.

 

 

 

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01.Free. The Five Tibetans "The Eye of Revelation" 1939/1946 editio
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Articles
New Articles (0)
All Articles (32)
Energy & Other Benefits of 'The Five Rites' (1)
Before You Start Practicing (2)
The Ist Rite – The Spin (5)
The 2nd Rite - Leg Raise
The 3rd Rite - Kneeling Backbend (1)
The 4th Rite - Tabletop
The 5th Rite - Pendulum (1)
Breathing With ‘The Tibetan Rites’ (2)
General Practice & Health Info (4)
6th Rite - Ancient Secret of the Fountain of Youth (1)
Peter Kelder, Rites History & Research (8)
The Eye of Revelation, Chakras, Energy (1)
Longevity, Anti-Aging Diet, Mantras (4)
Motivation, Long Term Practice (2)

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